Louisiana – the cause of all this…

Captain Ron
Captain Ron

Haoma

Several moths ago a fellow work collogue invited me down to Louisiana for a fishing trip sometime during the year. As he was telling me I should come down, I sat there and thought about it for a while and decided that if I didn’t make the trip a priority it would be like many other trips I had been invited on, great idea I should have done that. So built up the gumption and did whatever man does, I asked the boss (my wife) if we could plan a trip to New Orleans with on caviot, I got to fish the first two days. After selling my soul the plane tickets where purchased and a plan was made!

We arrived in New Orleans on a Wednesday in first part of June fairly early in the day knowing that she (the lovely wife) would have a wish list of National Parks and sites to see on our way out to the bayou. We arrived in Houma around 6 that evening which just happened to be when my work/fishing partner Dan was passing through town on his way to meet our guide Captain Ron a friend of his. He was staying with Ron but was nice enough to join us for dinner that night so we could catch up a put a plan together to fish the next day. We would be meeting at Ron’s the next morning around 5 and we all new that would be coming early

The next morning did came quick with some sleep and lots of anticipation. After a quick hello, short breakfast and a formal how are you we where off to launch the boat at one of the many local ramps. Ron having fished there waters for many years quickly had us speeding through the bayou toward open gulf water in search of speckled trout. The trout this time of year had left their wintertime hangout of the local marshes and waterways in search of their summer time homes out in the open water of the gulf. We had to travel about 30 miles via boat from our launch spot to our first set of fishing grounds. The plan of the day was to fish for trout on old rigs and pilings.

The run...

The run…

Sunrise on the the Gulf

Sunrise on the the Gulf

Our first stop of the morning was a set of pilings that Ron and been fishing with some great success the last few weeks. We pulled up, quietly dropped anchor and started casting plastic swim baits to the base of the pilings. It didn’t take long for us to find the first trout. The fish where short striking so the hit to hookup ratio was fairly low but fun nonetheless. Sadly shortly after we found the fish so did the dolphins, and I quickly learned that porpoises enjoy speckled trout as much as humans do. I put my first few trout of the trip in the box and the day was looking good. So with this spot being done for a good while, captain Ron had a great spot a few islands over he wanted to go try.

Captain Ron

Captain Ron

His sweet rig

His sweet rig

First Trout of the trip

First Trout of the trip

After another 20 minutes boat ride we pulled up to our next spot where a flooded marsh was draining out (low tide) through a narrow cut into the channel creating a small strip of running water. We pulled the boat in there and hammered a couple of nice trout right away. As we worked our way into the cove the trout bite died but Dan hooked into a giant 40lb black drum that gave him 10 minutes of all he wanted to fight. What a blast to see that fish go in a foot of water. As we worked our way out, Capt. Ron handed me a rod with a gold spoon and said, here catch a red fish would you. It took 15 minutes but I did manage to catch two keeper reds on back to back casts… those boys loved to fight and where just a blast to play with. We didn’t have any other takers but on our way out of the cove but man those 3 big fish sure where fun for us. We spent the next two hours fishing two more spots in between more 20 minutes boat rides yielding a scattered fish. Then Capt. Ron finally got the call he wanted; fish where going good at the pickets… And off we went for another 30 minutes of boat ridding.

At around 11 we where on our way to the pickets when Capt. Ron decided we had better have shrimp for our next stop at the pickets so a quick veer in the boat and off we went for a short 20 ride to the shrimp boat and then 30 minutes to the pickets… Now at this point it’s about noon and I am just having a blast but we only have about 7 of our needed 75 trout in the boat we some serious fishing that needs to be done.

150 Shrimp...

150 Shrimp…

Tank full of shrimp

Tank full of shrimp

We pulled up to the pickets in-time to see guys pulling fish in regularly so Dan and I’s excitement level grew proportionately! Capt. Ron quickly showed me (the newbie) how to hook a shrimp on a popping cork without killing it, some of great importance. Over the next 30 minutes it took us a while to figure out the exact location in out designated area to find fish and then it took me a few misses to figure out exactly what the tout wanted and how quick I had to be to get a hook in them when the bobber went under. With in the hour we where in them thick and old Capt. Ron even softened up enough to tell I was getting good at this. We proceeded to put about 60 trout in the box over the next 2 hours of magic. I was even able to get this quick video (we all know when the video camera come out the bite stops immediately):

The bite ended a quickly as it shut off that day with the tide change. We ended up getting 71 of our 75 keepers, no help from me dropping several at the boat and missing even more, but we still had a blast. That day we covered over 235 miles via boat, which was more than most, can say they did in a car. What a day for my first time on the LA bayou trout fishing.IMG_1208

First Red of the trip

First Red of the trip

Basket of trout

Basket of trout

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